Showing posts with label review. Show all posts
Showing posts with label review. Show all posts

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Read Only Popular Newly-Released Books? NAH! Reasons to Read Backlist Books




In the blogosphere you'll often notice that many bloggers seem to only be reviewing popular books. There are many reasons for that, free review copies, the hype around those books, or simply just seeing them in a bookstore and being unable to resist. 

Whichever reasons you may have for predominantly reading new books, allow me to introduce another concept: b a c k l i s t books.

What's a backlist book?

A backlist book is a book that has been out for quite some time. It's typically not promoted as much anymore, and probably not hyped as much anymore.

But won't reviewing "old" books impact my views negatively?

I mean, it's no secret that reviews aren't necessarily the way to go if you care a LOT about your views and only want to post stuff that will possibly blow up and go viral. Whether you review backlist or frontlist books, you won't get a lot views either way. 

But the thing is, not all bloggers are always on the lookout for the newest books. And bloggers aren't your only readers anyway, there are lots of people who read book blogs but don't blog themselves. And they won't have the faintest idea what you recently got in your inbox, what book just got sent out to reviewers and is everything everyone is reading. 

From experience, my own and that of others, I know that most people either go for reviews of 

a) books they have read                   or                      b) books they have heard a lot about. 

And either can be backlist or frontlist. It really, really, really doesn't matter to your readers what you review. If you are still skeptical, go for backlist books that have a lot of reviews and generally have been popular.

But why should I even read them?

Because it helps the authors and publishers tremendously! And we all should generally just stop always chasing the newest hit, this is super boring, don't you think? 
  • Imagine a world in which authors only get buzz in the first year that their book is out. 
  • Imagine a world in which you can't be a successful author unless you put out a new book every year. 
Sounds boring, doesn't it.

Backlist books don't bite, I don't get why this is even an issue I have to address. Do you purposely walk past book stores and not buy what's on sale unless it's a brand new book? C'mon. Stop this. Review backlist and frontlist, guys. 

Do you read backlist or frontlist books or a mix of both?

Continue Reading...

Monday, March 28, 2016

[Review] City of Glass (TMI #3) - Cassandra Clare: This Whole Incest Drama Is Getting Old



In CITY OF GLASS, the gang has to travel to Idris to find the one person that can help save Clary's mother and awaken her from the sleeping spell.

What intrigued me: Well, I had my issues with CITY OF ASHES and powered through it because I was hoping it would get better.


It all goes downhill from here...

What really caught my interest in this series in the first place was the brilliant first person narration in CITY OF BONES. By the third installment every character gets a point of view passage, even minor characters. There are multiple POV changes, sometimes even twice per page, and the only purpose they serve is info-dumping. 

Clare dumps information wherever she can, introducing minor characters for the sole purpose of narrating a bedtime story length flashback that nobody wants and nobody needs to understand the story. The main storyline is Clary, Simon and the shadowhunter gang (Isabelle, Alex, Magnus, Jace) going to the shadowhunter country Idris to find a cure for Clary's mother who has been in a coma for what feels like 78 years.

In itself, that's a great premise right there and I was hoping the series would start to catch my attention again, but it really just got worse. There are too many characters, too many complicated family relations that nobody cares about, and the reader is just not grounded. I wasn't rooting for anyone, how could I possibly when there are POV changes all the time? Not a single character in this is properly developed and just changing the POV doesn't really mask that. 

Who are all these people???

Yet again, I did not care. Clary and Jace are so replaceable and annoying, three books of their weird incest romance aren't going to change anything. I didn't care about them, even less about the mysterious new guy in Clary's life that's trying very desperately to kick off a new love triangle. I just... I can't. I'm sorry, but the character relationships are just non-existent. I had no fun, I wasn't rooting for anyone. 
I kept flipping back and forth trying to remember who all these shadowhunter families and their 427847382 offsprings are, I feel like you need an actual lexicon with all the names in order to understand everything that's going on. It's just not for me. It's too complicated, it requires way more attention that I'm willing to give, and I'm just really over it. 


Rating:

★★☆☆

 



Overall: Do I Recommend?

Absolutely not. One bad sequel is all every book series I start gets. But two bad sequels are unforgiveable.



Additional Info

Published: March 24th 2009
Pages: 541
Publisher: Margaret McElderry Books
Genre: YA / Fantasy / Urban Fantasy
ISBN: 9781416914303

Synopsis:
"To save her mother's life, Clary must travel to the City of Glass, the ancestral home of the Shadowhunters - never mind that entering the city without permission is against the Law, and breaking the Law could mean death. To make things worse, she learns that Jace does not want her there, and Simon has been thrown in prison by the Shadowhunters, who are deeply suspicious of a vampire who can withstand sunlight.

As Clary uncovers more about her family's past, she finds an ally in mysterious Shadowhunter Sebastian. With Valentine mustering the full force of his power to destroy all Shadowhunters forever, their only chance to defeat him is to fight alongside their eternal enemies. But can Downworlders and Shadowhunters put aside their hatred to work together? While Jace realizes exactly how much he's willing to risk for Clary, can she harness her newfound powers to help save the Glass City - whatever the cost?"(Source: Goodreads)



 Did you make it past CITY OF GLASS? What's your secret?

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Thursday, January 28, 2016

When To Post ARC Reviews: Pros and Cons of Posting On Release Day or Months Before | Book Blogging Tips (#36)





What I do is usually very simple. The second I get the ARC, I read it and then queue the review to be published exactly on the release day, or if I can't, I schedule it for the day before.

However, recent discussions about this with other bloggers made me contemplate whether there's a better method.

Usually it's expected of you to have the review ready and online by the time the book is released. That's why you're getting the ARC, to deliver instant reviews even when the book has only been out for half a second.

When you get an ARC, you usually have three(ish) options when to post the review

1) The second you finish (~3-6 months before release)

+ Even if that's months ahead, you already got it out of the way
+ There's no chance you'll forget about the book
- Literally nobody cares about a book that'll be published in a couple of months time
- Honestly, not even if it's Rick Riordan or Richelle Mead, one week after the announcement people stop caring = ZERO publicity profit
if somebody sees the review and wants the book, they can't get it yet. 

2) Close to the due date (~a week before release)

+ everybody knows the book is coming, everybody's searching for early reviews
+ traffic!!!
+ simultaneously early enough to create buzz around the book (publicists likey), but also late enough to make the release seem very close and get people excited (readers likey)
- if somebody sees the review and wants the book, they can't get it yet. 
- you'll have to plan this one ahead, either read the book right away and queue the post, or pray to God you'll make it in time

3) Last minute (on release day)

+ everybody knows the book is out, hello traffic
+ if you got somebody interested in the book, they can get it right away
- again, either queue or pray
- you won't be able to get people interested in the book before its release

4) #yolo

Of course you still have the "screw it" option, where you just post the review whenever. But in order to do that you really have to have your life/TBR together enough to manage to keep track of all your review copies. Because nothing's worse than requesting an ARC and not delivering a review at all. Don't do that. 

When in doubt:

Ask the publicist that you've been in contact with and don't listen to people online who are probably working with different publishers and publicists that also have different expectations of you.



Continue Reading...

Thursday, January 14, 2016

Why You Should Never Ever Take Review Inspiration From Goodreads | Book Blogging Tips (#34)




As a blogger, you probably also have a Goodreads account. Goodreads is a community where you can share reviews, book recommendations, and the like with your friends and discuss the latest books you read.

A huge part of the website is the review section. Anyone and everyone can publish reviews, sharing their opinion with the whole world. 

There are absolutely no rules, and this is exactly why the worst thing an aspiring blogger can do, is to copy-and-paste their super popular Goodreads reviews onto a blog.



The Difference Between Reviewing on Goodreads and Independently

Most reviews on Goodreads are angry rants. The more you write about why you hate a book, the more likes you're going to get from similar-minded people. While I'm a-ok with expressing a negative opinion, it always always always depends on the tone. On Goodreads, people can vote on your review. The more likes and comments it has, the more likely it is to get around and be seen by a lot of people. Logically, the reviews that are shared a lot are the ones that polarize. 

Consequentially - what do people do when they want to get famous on Goodreads? Write controversial reviews, mostly involving swear words, GIFs, quotes, and anything to support your negative or positive opinion. 

If you're reviewing on a blog, your focus isn't on the looks of the review, but the content. At least it should be. Of course you're supposed to have a certain common theme and aesthetic to your reviews, but it's all about your opinion.
On Goodreads, it's all about attention, getting comments and likes, and ideally also ridiculing the author. 

Why Goodreads-Reviewing Is Terrible 

On Goodreads you won't only find a lot readers, but also authors.
Many popular and famous authors do have a Goodreads account, so there's a chance that they'll read what you have written. Most popular Goodreads Reviewers don't have independent blogs and strictly stick to the website. But I've seen a few people try to transition with those hate-filled and flat out mean reviews you'll find on the site.

If you don't know what I mean by goodreads-reviewing, here's a review from a very popular Goodreads reviewer for Becoming Jinn by Lori Goldstein


[Source]


Imagine being the author and having to read that your book made someone want to gouge their eyes out. So much work from a copious amount of people goes into writing a book. If you're going to review it, don't do it like this. It's insanely disrespectful, childish, and mean.

As an aspiring blogger, I can just urge you to aim for the highest level of professionalism you can, while staying true to yourself. Don't look at Goodreads and try to write your reviews like the popular people on there. 


What's Your Opinion on Goodreads-

Reviewing?


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Monday, January 4, 2016

[Review] The Quest for Integrity - Jaswinder Singh




THE QUEST FOR INTEGRITY is an enthralling tale about politics in modern-day India; about corruption versus integrity. It's set against the background of the Bank of the Nation and a worker's union made up of its employees. 

What intrigued me: I'm a huge politics nerd and a book about the gritty details of the dealings of a bank with its union is just my thing.

Characters lack personality

I've always been interested in politics and this is such a detail-oriented tale about corruption and the struggle against it that I just couldn't put it down. The various intrigues of the characters who only think of their own gain are fascinating to uncover.

The big setback of this novel are sadly the characters themselves. I love to connect with the characters of the books I read but this time it just didn't happen. Basically, there are only three types of characters: the good ones, the bad ones, and the ones that are good but made to behave in bad ways.
A little less black-and-white thinking wouldn't have hurt.

Plus, in the beginning I really stumbled over the way they talk. Their speech seems unnaturally formal and sometimes even stilted. This only adds to the characters' obvious lack of personality. Though I did get used to the way everyone speaks after a while, it's hard to identify or at least emphasize with the characters. I didn't really care all that much about who wins or loses.  

This novel leaves you thinking

Singh really knows how to pace. The plot develops at the perfect speed and before you know it, you're in the middle of it. I loved that the events slowly but surely escalated. At first the power struggles are expressed mostly verbally, but they quickly spread over into actions. The way the characters trip down the lane of their own lies and deceptions is absolutely fascinating.

THE QUEST FOR INTEGRITY is insanely philosophical. Don't mistake it for some light entertaining reading – this novel wants to make you think and it will. Ever so often, a line would make me pause, put down the book and really consider it for a while. The plot serves mainly to illustrate the ethical issues the book is exploring: the way power corrupts. Here, the book makes up for its cardboard characters. It reads like a Medieval Morality Play, with good struggling against evil, the characters serving only as representations of that. This feeling to it is what sets it apart from other books.

While the novel isn't easy reading, the topic got me hooked and the clean simple writing had me turning the pages.

 Rating:

★★☆☆



Overall: Do I Recommend?

Yes – but: I'd only recommend this novel to someone who is inherently interested in politics like I am. If that's your thing, do pick up this novel because you'll love it. If it's not, I'm sorry to say but this won't be the novel to get you interested in it either.

______________________________________

GUEST REVIEW by Steffi 



Additional Info

Original Title: The Quest for Integrity
Author: Jaswinder Singh
Published: January 27th 2013
Pages: 300
Medium: ebook
Genre: Adult / Literary
ISBN: 9781481203876

Synopsis:
"A noble, accomplished man named Purshottam Gill is chosen to replace the latest in a line of negligent managers at the Amlawar branch of India’s nationalized bank. As he attempts to improve the branch’s performance and raise employee morale, he becomes hindered by corrupt trade union officials, politicians, and even some of the bank’s senior officers. He soon discovers that top union leaders control not just the bank, but the politics of his country, causing its citizens to live under fear and great hardships. 

Having come from a life of poverty and disease, Neki Lal, the union leader for Purshottam’s bank, values money and success above all else. Viewing Purshottam’s integrity as a threat, Neki begins a deceptive and corrupt campaign to try and intimidate Purshottam and remove him from his position at the bank. And Purshottam’s loyal employees have no choice but to follow the union directive.

As Neki Lal and his supporters begin to take over the branch, deception and manipulation reign supreme in a battle of good and evil that will forever change the lives of everyone involved.

A riveting tale of power and corruption, The Quest for Integrity is a thought-provoking and inspiring story that illustrates the importance of dignity, morality, and social responsibility.
 "(Source: Goodreads)


Do you like books about politics?

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Thursday, December 10, 2015

How to Deal With DNFs | Book Blogging Tips (#29)


We've all had it and we all dread it. DNF-ing a book is probably one of the worst things to happen to a book blogger. 

But sometimes you just don't want to finish a book and that's perfectly okay. 

What is a DNF?
A DNF is a book you did not finish for what reason ever.



Why It's Okay
Not all books are for everyone. 
You have to think like this: If you're forcing yourself to finish every single book you start, you'll miss out on a lot of great books while you're stuck reading the shitty ones. Life is too short to torture yourself with bad literature. Don't feel bad because your taste doesn't match with every single thing you read.

I've even DNF-ed books and afterwards went on to ask a friend who read it about what happened next. If you simply don't feel like the writing clicks with you - don't read it. You're under no obligation to finish any book.

When to DNF
  • You don't have any enthusiasm left for the book, you're dreading every page you have to read. When is it over again?
  • You dislike the characters so much that you've just stopped caring about their journey
  • The author pulls an unforgiveable faux-pas
  • The plot is too graphic, too emotional, too violent etc. for your taste
  • Poor langugae makes you have to guess what the author is trying to tell you
  • Copy cats: Haven't you seen this somewhere else? 

As you see, there are millions of reasons to DNF a book. If yours is not on this list I'm not even surprised. You can DNF for thousands of reasons and every single one is a justified and perfectly okay reason to.

What if it's an ARC?

Actually, most publishers I've worked with state in a the package leaflet that it's okay if you dislike a book. You don't even have to DNF it- if you flat out change your mind about wanting to read a review copy , you should send your contact an email. 

Most publishers are very considerate. You can even send the copy to another blogger for review and inform your industry contact. You don't even have to be specific as to why you didn't want to read the review copy after all. Just be respectful and state that the book wasn't for you.

With review copies though I have a minimum of 50 pages for every book to get me hooked. Don't DNF if you've only read ten pages, especially not with review copies, that's just disrespectful. 


How do you handle DNFs?

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Thursday, November 19, 2015

How To Queue Posts Months in Advance | Book Blogging Tips (#26)



I was actually asked to share my take on the topic with you guys, because I mentioned in one my previous BBT posts how heavily queued my blog is.

To me, queuing is essential if you want to publish nice content frequently. Here some tips on how I manage to keep on queuing.



1. Use Your Creative Highs

Sometimes you will feel like blogging and sometimes you won't. The key is to notice when you feel like writing and to write the heck out of it. Write until you feel like puking at the thought of writing another post. 
I've actually written twenty posts in a day before, just because I forced myself to keep on doing it. You'd be surprised how fun it is to and how satisfying it is to see the number of your queued posts rising up!

2. Have Set Content 

If you know what your blog is supposed to be about it will get way easier to queue in advance. Reviews are obviously excluded from this. Find a set schedule for every day of the week, or just every week.
Based on memes, an example schedule for bloggers that aspire to post every day would be this:

  • Monday: What are you reading? or Mailbox Monday 
  • Tuesday: Teaser Tuesday or Top Ten Tuesday
  • Wednesday: Wishlist Wednesday or Waiting on Wednesday
  • Thursday: Freebie
  • Friday: The Friday 56 or Friday Finds
  • Saturday: Original (personal post or own feature)
  • Sunday: Sunday Salon or Weekly Wrap Up

As you see, if you're a friend of them there are memes for every day of the week. A great source to find more memes is the Book Blog Meme Directory.

3. Launch Your Own Memes/Original Content


Since I started Book Blogging Tips, I noticed that it gets way easier to schedule stuff in advance. Sometimes when I'm writing up a post, an idea for another one just pops into my head. Having your own feature will surely inspire you to make a lot of posts at once. It's also extremely satisfying when the first people start linking to your posts.


Beware: Don't copy other people's stuff, give it a new name and pretend it's your own content. Especially with memes you can easily slip into the direction of plagiarism and this isn't good for your reputation and it will cost you a lot of readers.

Also, it's illegal. So stay away from that. Your own ideas are way better than the copied content anyways.

4. Reviews: Write Them Immediately


I know this can get super tiring and it's annoying and sometimes you don't even feel like writing a review. Believe me, I know.
You just have to go through it, because:

  1. Your thoughts are fresh when you just finished the book
  2. You won't remember as many details in two days time
  3. Depending on the book you may have even forgotten about it altogether!
..and we don't want that. A great idea is to read other people's reviews on Goodreads if you don't feel like you have anything to say. You'll quickly notice that you agree or disagree and there you go - your first thoughts are waiting to be put on paper. It's not a shame if you only write half a review, you can still write the rest a few days later, it's just important to get the first draft done.


What are your tips on queuing posts in advance?

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Thursday, October 8, 2015

9 Methods to Write A Sucky Book Review | Book Blogging Tips (#20)


I've let you in on the secrets of writing good reviews already, now it's time to show you what NOT to do. Reviewing may be a matter of style and personal preference but there are at least nine surefire ways to mess up. Avoid those.


1. Synopsis > Review

Make sure that you have a review in the first place! If your review is 90% synopsis and one sentence of opinion, you're doing something wrong

2. Where's the Opinion?

Your review should make clear what you thought of the novel. There has to be a rating and you HAVE to state what you think. You don't necessarily need to sum up at the end, but your reader has to know what you think about the book after they read the review

3. Review ≠ Summary

Don't narrate the plot. Your readers don't only want to hear what the book is about three times, they want to know what you thought of it

4. Unlabeled Spoilers

If you want to get insulted in your comments, that's the way to do it! Posting hardcore spoilers is a no-go and seriously, why. You're just ruining other people's days and possibly attracting their fury. 

5. War and Peace #2

It's nice to write out your opinion and sometimes you just have to post a very long review. I understand that it's not easy to get it all in, but that's why reviewing is a craft. 

If your reviews are always more than 1000-1500 words long you should really learn to shorten them. Occasionally it's fine, but don't do it every time.

6. "Mini-Reviews"

I don't know why this is a thing and I don't want to know. So-called mini reviews are super short reviews, I've seen people post 5 sentence long ones. I personally think that you shouldn't do things halfheartedly

If you don't have the time to write a proper review, wait and do it when you do have the time. It's extremely disrespectful to the author to do this instead of a full review when you've received a review copy. I've seen it all.

7. GIFs

It's some people's style to add some reaction GIFs and that's perfectly okay. But if you need fifteen GIFs or more and then add about a sentence each for your review, that's a little unsettling. I wonder what your review would look like without all those GIFs. 

Maybe try and state your opinion verbally and cut out two or three of them, I'm sure you'll be able to convey the same message easily.

8. Quotes, Quotes, Quotes

If I wanted to read quotes, I'd actually bother to buy the book instead of reading your review. Did you know that it's against the copyright for most publishers to use a quote that's longer than 25 words? 

You actually have to pay for the right to be able to use quotes of that length. I'm sure you didn't contact the publisher and acquire rights for that, so stop it right there. 
A quote here and there is fine, but when you're copying an actual paragraph it's not only illegal, but also super annoying to read. Scratch out the quote and just describe what it says. 

9. No Formatting

It makes it 299% easier for your readers to read longer texts if you format. There's italic, bold and underline set in your blogging plat form as default script editing for a reason. Use bigger and smaller fonts, use colors, go nuts! If you don't, people won't bother reading your longer posts.


What are your reviewing NO-GOs?



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Thursday, July 16, 2015

6 Things Your Blog Design HAS TO Have | Book Blogging Tips (#8)


Bloggers know the eternal struggle: How to find the perfect design. 

If you're a little like me, you're constantly changing and trying to improve things to make your design the best it can be.

While taste differs, there are 6 things your blog absolutely has to have.




1. A Proper Comment System

With proper I mean no pop-ups, no captcha, no google+ only (for the Blogger people)
If you make it nice and easy to comment, you'll definitely see more people making use of that option. The default systems of Blogger and Wordpress are fine, but more and more bloggers make use of other commenting systems.

Popular third-party-commenting systems are:
2. Contact Page

This is important for networking. Whether it's other bloggers or authors and publishers wanting to contact you. If you haven't already, get an email address specifically for your blog. Social media icons are also a nice way to give your readers an overview where they can find and connect with you

3. Related Posts Widget

I didn't have this for a long time and I actually don't know how I could live without this. Related posts are a great way to show your reader similar stuff and also look nice on your home page.
The widget I use is LinkWithin.

4. Multiple Options for Following

I've actually seen blogs with only one option to follow. While I understand that everyone has their preferred way that they'd like to be followed by, note that not everyone might want to use this. Consider adding at least two of the options below:
  • Email
  • Google Friend Connect
  • BlogConnect
  • BlogLovin
  • Facebook
  • G+
  • Linky
  • NetworkedBlogs
The more options you give your readers, the more followers you'll be able to get.

5. Search Bar

This goes without saying. People have to be able to find content that's not on the first page easily.

6. Review Index

This is essential (!!!) for book bloggers. Your readers have to be able to find your reviews and please put it on a separate page. 
Just linking to all posts you tagged as reviews doesn't really help, especially if you combine this with not having a search bar. Make the effort to add a page just for reviews and sort them.


What Do You Think Every Blogger Has to Have on Their Blog?


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Tuesday, May 5, 2015

[Review] The Chase (The Forbidden Game #2) - L.J. Smith


In THE CHASE, Jenny and her friends think they have escaped the mysterious Shadow Man Julian. Little do they know that the intruders that took the game at the end of  THE HUNTER are already trying to figure out what it is. When they release Julian - whether on purpose or not - Jenny, Tom, Dee, Audrey, Zach and Mike have to watch their every step. Julian is back, and he wants to play a game.

Couldn't Put It Down!

I don't know what it is about L.J. Smith's writing, but I couldn't, for the life of me, put this novel down. When I had to other things I was just thinking about the novel and wishing to go back to reading. I love, love, love the idea still, and I love how it's reminiscent of Jumanji (the book was actually published before the film) - but with more angst and more blood.

Just like with the first novel, I couldn't identify with Jenny. She's just as unapproachable and unlikeable as Elena from her Vampire Diaries Series. Even after having read the first novel I still didn't really know who was who! Smith does her best to add description all the time and little hints so you can picture everyone in your head, but only halfway through this one I could finally keep up with the characters. Every single character is this novel has their distinct obsessions and interest, but it took a very long time for me to actually "get" the characters and start to like them.

Can somebody explain to me though what the fascination that everyone has for Jenn she's just too perfect.

An Extraordinary Plot That Saves the Day!

The odd thing is, that it doesn't even matter that I didn't like her or any of her friends. I am absolutely and utterly in love with the story idea, the whole "Teenagers play a magical game and it goes wrong" thing. The first one felt like reading a horror movie in an alternate universe where the characters aren't too stupid to see the obvious traps and run into the monsters arms. Having this novel extended into a series is like watching what happens after that movie and it's just so unique and interesting. I haven't read a single YA novel that had JUST the plot line for the horror in it and didn't settle for a mediocre romance side plot.

Yes, we do have the relationship between Jenny and the antagonist Julian, but that's a completely different thing. It's absolutely interesting and he's a terrifying character that I just can't figure out at all. Of course it's again very unrealistic that the super villain falls for the girl, but Smith does her best to explain everything logically. I can't understand why this novel series isn't extremely popular, it has everything I've been missing in YA Horror in the last couple of months, even years.

Another striking thing about this novel is that you can absolutely tell a lot of planning went into writing the series. There are some things that the characters say or do that just leaves me speechless. The little riddles that Julian gives them during the game for example are just brilliant. The way she manages to maneuver her characters out of every oh so dangerous situation is absolutely genius. Seriously, usually I tend to roll my eyes at magical solutions for problems, but the way L.J. Smith solves the characters' challenges is amazing. I'm in awe.


Rating:

★★★

 

Overall: Do I Recommend?

I love L.J. Smith's writing and I love her beautiful mind. She always manages to come up with new concepts that I'm eager to read about and this novel is no exception. I'm convinced that this is one of those novels that I'd probably reread times and times over and that's a very rare thing. Can't wait to start the third one! I haven't been disappointed by L.J. Smith so far and I can gladly recommend this series. Start with the first novel though, you're missing out!




Additional Info

Pages: 288
Genre: YA / Horror

Synopsis:
"Jenny's friends are lost one by one to a ghostly wolf and a phantom snake, instruments of the sinister but attractive Shadow Man, who has returned from the Shadow World with a deadly game called ""Lambs and Monsters.""



Have You Read Any of L.J. Smith Novels?

What Is Your Favorite Novel By Her?

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